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No.3 Lead Hand Hook

What is a Lead Hand Hook?

A punch from the lead hand that moves along the transverse axis in a sideward ‘sweeping’ motion. (Thomson, Lamb and Nichols, 2015). The punch can be landed from short, mid and long range. Short to mid range shots generate more power, while the long range hook is more of a tactical shot and opens up your opponent for other shots. 

Learning The Technique of a Short Range Hook

  1. In your boxing stance, the hook starts with an explosive thrust from the toes on your front foot.  This thrust rotates your upper-body around the central axis so that your hips and shoulders align. The back foot slams down into the ground causing the power to travel up the body.

  2. As your trunk rotates, the lead shoulder / arm accelerates toward the target approximately at 45 degree elbow joint angle.   

  3. As the fist approaches the target, no more than 6 inches away from your face, the palm is facing back towards you. The power is pushed back towards your body.

  4. After the shot lands, the boxer has two choices, either return to the defensive stance or combine shots. 

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Learning The Technique of A Mid Range Hook. 

The mid range shot follows the same foot protocol of the short range hook. With the difference been the angle of elbow extension and alignment of the hand on contact.

  1. As your trunk rotates, the lead shoulder / arm accelerates toward the target approximately at 90 degree elbow joint angle.   

  2. As the fist approaches the target, no more than 12 inches away from your face, the palm is facing down and the power is forced perpendicular to your body. 

  3. After the shot lands, the boxer has two choices, either return to the defensive stance or combine shots. 

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Learning The Technique of a Long Range Hook.  

  1. In your boxing stance, start by pushing from the lead foot, the push should rotate the body around the central axis.

  2. The shot needs to arc in order to ‘flank’ the opponents back hand guard. 

  3. As the fist approaches the target, it rotates inwards 180 degrees so the knuckles land on the target. 

  4. The fist returns along a straight line, returning to the guard position.

  5. After the shot lands, the boxer has two choices, either return to the defensive stance or combine shots.